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Ordering lunch and a Gigabit LAN access switch

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It was during Mardi Gras when I realized how choices affect our decisions.  My best friend Tom and I were standing in line at a fast-food restaurant and the girl in front of us was stumped.  She looked up at the menu, with its vast array of heart-stopping choices and spent the better part of 5 minutes verbally working out a selection between her and herself.  “Do you want a #1, #2, or #3?” Tom finally interrupted.  She quickly chose #1.

What if I told you that choosing the right networking switch to connect users and devices at Gigabit speeds is as simple as ordering lunch? With Dell Networking, you have 3 choices for Gigabit LAN access switches: a 2800, 5500, or 7000 series.  Let’s compare them with some common lunch options.  Which one would you like?

Warning: Do not consume the rest of the blog if you are near mealtime.

For those watching their IT diet, the Dell Networking 2800 series is perfect for small office connectivity or for those with limited access to technical proficiency.  Its simple, user-friendly, web-based, graphical user interface (GUI) makes light configuration a breeze.  Gigabit speeds will push files around the office quickly. For the switch, there are 4 models to choose: 8, 16, 24, or 48 ports. For the salad, there are 4 dressings to choose: French, Italian, bleu cheese, or honey mustard.

For those looking for a meatier option when it comes to control, the Dell Networking 5500 series is more configurable than the 2800 and operates at higher performance with dual 10 Gigabit uplinks.  Use its web-based GUI or intuitive and familiar CLI for advanced configuration. This switch can be stacked up to 8 high with other 5500 series switches to simplify management. For the switch, Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) is available for powering attached devices.  For the cheeseburger, bacon can be added for taste enhancement.

For those looking for a mouthwatering, master chef prepared choice, the Dell Networking 7000 series is more advanced than the 5500 as it has routing capabilities (Layer 3), better performance, stacking up to 12 devices, and can handle server or iSCSI storage traffic with ease.  This is the premiere LAN Gigabit switch for speed, flexibility, and advanced control.  The burger uses only the highest grade sirloin and is hand-shaped before cooking to perfection then topped with sharp cheddar cheese and served on a Kaiser roll.  This is a burger lover’s paradise.  For the switch, Power-over-Ethernet Plus (PoE+) is available for powering attached devices with higher wattage requirements.  For the burger, two thick slices of black-pepper bacon can be added for extreme flavor.

Whatever Dell Networking switch you chose, it will connect directly to your existing Ethernet infrastructure and all of these switches come with a Lifetime Limited Warranty which guarantees repair or replacement for as long as you own the product.

As for lunch, I’m craving BBQ, so I’m choosing a 2 pound $35 Texas beef rib from Louie Mueller’s Barbeque in Taylor, Texas.  Goes perfect with my Dell Networking 8100 series 10 Gigabit switch.  Whatever you choose…Bon Appétit and continue the conversation by following @DellNetworking on Twitter.

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